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Researchers Examine Tone-Deafness and Decoding Emotions

A new study has revealed that those with congenital amusia (commonly referred to as tone-deafness) have trouble decoding emotions in speech and find it hard to pick up on emotional cues in conversation.

amusia, tone-deaf, conversation, hearing loss"In all speech there is a musical quality that is created by differences in the timing, pitch and loudness of the speaker. Tone of voice can be used to differentiate a statement from a question, or a sad expression from fearful. Amusic individuals have trouble hearing these subtle differences and so often find it hard understanding the emotional tenor of a conversation," said lead researcher Dr Bill Thompson, Macquarie University.

The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, tested how well tone-deaf people were able to detect emotions such as sadness, happiness, tenderness, irritation and fear. Compared with those who were not tone-deaf, the accuracy rate for detecting certain emotions was up to 20% lower.

The reason for this impairment is a reduced sensitivity to the subtle changes in pitch that speakers often use to convey emotion in their voices. When emotions were conveyed by other cues such as loudness or duration, the tone-deaf individuals were much better.

"Participants were most likely to confuse emotional categories that differed from each other mainly in pitch intonation, and were similar to each other in loudness and duration. For example, tender and sad speech were often confused with each other, as was irritated and fearful speech," said Thompson.

Tone-deaf participants reported greater difficulty understanding how people felt merely by listening to them speak (for example, on the telephone), and said they relied more heavily on facial expressions and gestures when interpreting the moods and feelings of people during conversations. 

"That the tone-deaf participants were more likely to report difficulties interpreting subtle aspects of speech – such as sarcasm – indicates that there is definitely some self-awareness of their deficit and how it affects their social interactions," says Thompson.

Though up to 17% of individuals suspect they are tone-deaf, the prevalence of true congenital amusia is estimated to be lower, and while it does not cause a major impediment the discovery that congenital amusia are not restricted to music does have wider social implication.

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